JAR Lab

JointAction_logoWelcome to the newest addition to our Research Suite in the School of Physiotherapy. The Joint Action Research (JAR) Laboratory was made possible through a Canadian Foundation for Innovation Award, Nova Scotia Research and Innovation Trust, Dalhousie University, Faculty of Health Professions and Physiotherapy Alumni Funds.

Millions of Canadians are affected by musculoskeletal disease and injury, with this number projected to grow exponentially in the coming years. The focus of the JAR lab is to better understand how these injuries and diseases affecting bones, joints and muscle impact lower extremity joint and muscle function during gait related tasks. These data have implications for understanding impairments to joint function that translate to important activities such as walking, and provide a framework for physiotherapy evaluation and treatment planning.

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Using a state-of-the-art dual belt instrumented perturbation treadmill, eight high performance motion capture cameras and surface electromyography, we are able to quantify bilateral three-dimensional ankle, knee and hip biomechanics, as well as trunk kinematics and 16 channels of muscle activation recording.

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The goal of the JAR lab, along with continuing on in traditional gait analysis investigations, is to develop walking based stress testing for lower extremity injury and disease. Stress tests are routinely completed for heart and lung function, why not make it a reality for joint and muscle health assessment and evaluation.

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If you would like to find out more about the JAR lab or discuss the potential for research collaboration, contact Derek Rutherford at djr@dal.ca or ring 902.494.4248.OpenHouse48

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